Archive | Sci-Tech

Spectacular footage of ISRO’s record PSLV launch and separation of satellites as seen by onboard camera – Watch

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Spectacular footage of ISRO’s record PSLV launch and separation of satellites as seen by onboard camera – Watch

Posted on 17 February 2017 by GGS News

New Delhi : The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) created history on February 15 when its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) carried 104 satellites to space in a single launch.The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) created history on February 15 when its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) carried 104 satellites to space in a single launch.

HERE’S WHAT THE DAILY PRINTED
This is perhaps the first widely followed world record India has made in the field of space technology. Indians have a reason to be proud,” the daily said.
“However, the space technology race is not mainly about the number of satellites at one go. It’s fair to say the significance of this achievement is limited. In this regard, Indian scientists know more than the Indian public, who are encouraged by media reports.”
“It’s a hard-won achievement for India to reach current space technology level with a relatively small investment. It offers food for thought for other countries. India launched a lunar probe in 2008 and ranked first among Asian countries by having an unmanned rocket orbit Mars in 2013.
“Nonetheless, the development of a country’s space technology is determined by the size of its input.
“The US space budget in 2013 was $39.3 billion, China $6.1 billion, Russia $5.3 billion, Japan $3.6 billion and India $1.2 billion.
“As India’s GDP is about one-fifth to one-fourth that of China’s, the share of investment in space technology in India’s GDP is similar to that of China’s.
“There is another figure that deserves attention. India’s defence budget is about one-third of China’s, a higher percentage of GDP than that of China.
“On the whole, India’s space technology still lags behind the US’ and China’s. It has not yet formed a complete system.
“There is no Indian astronaut in space and the country’s plan to establish a space station has not started.”IT

Comments (0)

ISRO sets world record by successfully launching 104 satellites in single mission

Tags: , , , , ,

ISRO sets world record by successfully launching 104 satellites in single mission

Posted on 15 February 2017 by GGS News

Sriharikota : Today at 9.30 am, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) marked its name in history by setting a new world record after launching 104 satellites into orbit in a single mission. The launch saw PSLV-C37 pushing a mindboggling 104 satellites into orbit.

Of the 104 satellites, 101 satellites were from international clients. Of the 101 international co-passenger nano-satellites, 96 are from the US, and one each from Israel, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates. The weight of all the satellites at launch totals 1,378 kg.The countdown for the launch of PSLV-C37/Cartosat2 Series satellite mission began at 5:28 AM soon after the Mission Readiness Review committee and Launch Authorisation Board gave its approval for lift off, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said.
This mission was ISRO’s second successful attempt after launching 23 satellites in one go in June 2015. PSLV first launched the 714 kg CARTOSAT-2 Series satellite for earth observation and then injected the 103 co-passenger satellites, together weighing about 664 kg at lift-off into polar Sun Synchronous Orbit, about 520 km from Earth. ISRO scientists have used the XL Variant — the most powerful rocket — earlier used in the ambitious Chandrayaan and during the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM).
Out of the 101 co-passenger satellites onboard, a total of 96 belong to USA alone, five are from International customers to ISRO, which include Israel, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, respectively. Two Indian nano satellites, weighing a total of around 1,378 kg, also rode piggyback on the PSLV rocket. The nano-satellites belonging to international customers were launched as part of the arrangement by Antrix Corporation Ltd (ANTRIX) the commercial arm of the ISRO.
Cartosat-2 Series, which is the primary satellite, will be similar to the earlier four satellites in Cartosat-2 Series. After coming into operation, it will provide remote sensing services. Images sent by it will be useful for coastal land use and regulation, road network monitoring, distribution of water and creation of land use maps, among others. Cartosat-2 Series has a mission life of five years.
The two Indian Nano-satellites INS-1A and INS-1B were developed as co-passenger satellites to accompany bigger satellites on PSLV. The primary objective of INS (ISRO Nano Satellite) is to provide an opportunity for ISRO technology demonstration payloads, provide a standard bus for launch on demand services.
INS-1A carries Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function Radiometer and INS-1B caries Earth Exosphere Lyman Alpha Analyser as payloads.
In its 39th flight, the PSLV launched the 714-kg Cartosat-2 satellite for earth observation and 103 co-passenger satellites, together weighing about 664kg, at lift-off. The satellites have been successfully placed in an orbit 505km above the Earth.
ISRO has confirmed that all the 104 satellites were sucessfully seperated from the launch vehicle and are being placed into their respective orbits.
After the launch, PM Narendra Modi congratulated ISRO team for successful launch of 104 satellites: space agency chief A S Kiran Kumar.DECCAN CHRONICLE.

Comments (0)

India tests exo-atmospheric ballistic missile interception – Know all about it

Tags: , , , , , ,

India tests exo-atmospheric ballistic missile interception – Know all about it

Posted on 11 February 2017 by GGS News

Balasore : The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) on Saturday successfully tested an exo-atmospheric missile interception as part of the ballistic missile defence programme, sources informed.

At 7.45 am, on the east coast of India, an incoming missile was successfully intercepted at a height of 100 kms with a direct hit by an interceptor missile, said a top DRDO official.

The interceptor is based on the nuclear-capable Prithvi missile.IANS

Comments (0)

ISRO to launch record 104 satellites on February 15: Things to know

Tags: , , , , , ,

ISRO to launch record 104 satellites on February 15: Things to know

Posted on 08 February 2017 by GGS News

New Delhi : The India Space Research Organization (ISRO) is conducting its mega-launch program on February 15, under which it will set off total 104 satellites to space. As scheduled, the satellites will take off at one go around 9 am from Sriharikota spaceport, Andhra Pradesh on February 15.
ISRO will create history by launching a record of 104 satellites, including 101 from foreign countries, out of which 88 are from the United States and the remaining are from Israel, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Arab Emirates. The rest 3 belongs to India itself.
All satellites will be placed in the lower orbit of the earth for monitoring the planet and its ongoing actions.
ISRO will take up its most efficient launcher rocket ‘PSLV-C37’- Polar Satellite launch Vehicle for setting the satellites in motion. It’s a 320-tonne rocket which will launch all the satellites with a combined weight of 1,500 kg, including the 650 kg remote-sensing Cartosat-2 and two nano-satellites (IA and IB) weighing 15 kg each.
The launch of 104 satellites will surpass the 37 satellites launch record set in June 2014 and 29 satellites launched by NASA in 2013. The Indian space agency has already launched 20 satellites in one shot in June 2016.
If ISRO succeeds in conducting this mega-launch program, then it will be honored as the only agency to launch the highest number of satellites in one go.

Comments (0)

Budget 2017: Here’s what’s cheaper and what’s dearer!

Tags: , , , ,

Budget 2017: Here’s what’s cheaper and what’s dearer!

Posted on 01 February 2017 by GGS News

New Delhi : Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on Wednesday presented the Union Budget 2017 which the government hailed as ‘path-breaking’ while PM Modi termed it as ‘uttam’ Budget.
And while custom and excise duty has been hike on some, it has been reduced on some products which will eventually lead to commodities getting costlier or cheaper.

In his speech, Jaitley said his proposals on excise and customs duties will not result in any significant loss or gain to the exchequer, the fine print suggests a host of items can become either cheaper or dearer.

So, here is the list of items that are getting cheaper and dearer.

CHEAPER

Vegetable tanning extracts, namely, Wattle extract and Myrobalan fruit extract

Liquefied Natural Gas

Printed circuit boards for mobiles

Micro ATMs

Finger-print machines

Iris scanners

LED bulbs, lumps

Nylon mono filament yarn

Hot Rolled Coils

Solar Panels

POS card reader

DEARER

Silver coins

Cigarettes and tobacco

Paper rolled bidis

Pan Masala

Tobacco

Goods imported through parcels

Water filter membranes

Cashew nuts.ZEENEWS

Comments (0)

This mind blowing video captured by robot shows colourful world below Antarctica sea ice

Tags: , , , , , , ,

This mind blowing video captured by robot shows colourful world below Antarctica sea ice

Posted on 22 December 2016 by GGS News

New Delhi : An underwater robot in East Antarctica has captured a rare glimpse beneath the Antarctic sea ice, revealing a thriving, colourful world. The footage shows beautiful to dreadful water creatures on camera in their world.

“When you think of the Antarctic coastal marine environment, the iconic species such as penguins, seals and whales usually steal the show, said Dr GlennJohnstone, Australian Antarctic Division Biologist.

“This footage reveals a habitat that is productive, colourful, dynamic and full of a wide variety of biodiversity, including sponges, sea spiders, urchins, sea cucumbers and sea stars, he added.

Coconut-shaped sponges, dandelion-like worms, pink encrusting algae and spidery starfish are some to name a few under the sea ice at O’Brien Bay, near Casey research station inEast Antarctica.

“Occasionally an iceberg may move around and wipe out an unlucky community, but mostly the sea ice provides protection from the storms that rage above, making it a relatively stable environment in which biodiversity can flourish,” said Johnstone.

Scientists see this as a great opportunity to explore the underwater biodiversity and complexity of the Antarctic near-shore ecosystem and the threats it is facing into the future. But ocean acidification remains one of the biggest threats to these organisms.News Nation

Comments (0)

After Twitter hack of businessman, journalists, Legion now claims mail leak of 74,000 chartered accountants

Tags: , , , , , , ,

After Twitter hack of businessman, journalists, Legion now claims mail leak of 74,000 chartered accountants

Posted on 16 December 2016 by GGS News

New Delhi, He is an 18-year-old somewhere in India. Or so, he says. And he is part of Legion, the hacker group that has got India’s attention after several high-profile email and Twitter hacks, and some extensive data dumps.He shared with TOI a list of what he claims are email addresses and passwords of nearly 74,000 chartered accountants in the country.Over an encrypted text chat, the hacker also claimed to have already compromised the accounts of former IPL chairman Lalit Modi, and the sansad.nic.in domain though the data is yet to be dumped. In a veiled threat, he also said Delhi Police should strengthen their own passwords rather than try to catch them.”We have dumpz (sic) from all the major institutions…all the major banks and passwords…of all da chartered accountants in INDIA. And those that had the same pw on Dropbox? Too bad, they got owned (compromised) and all the dox were dumped. The people they work for? Too bad for them too. Raw data brings chaos,” the hacker said, sharing a link to the email and password list.He also claimed the group would release more raw data without sifting through it.The hacker answered questions selectively, ignoring some while typing back expansively for others. In the beginning, he emphasised their activities were purely for the “Lulz” – a term that means “just for kicks” – and that they were just cyber criminals and drug addicts.
For a few minutes, he claimed to be “individually a group of people”. However, he soon began to speak of a group of individuals, which Legion has earlier claimed to be numbering in the “higher single digits”. The group has been working as “Legion” for just a few weeks, he said.The hacker claimed that they did not care for politics, and insisted he was “sick” of “this bulls**t”. However, when asked about results they expected from the leaks, he displayed a combative disinterest.
“Do you think we care too much (about results)?” he asked, and later added, “We are not your heroes. We are drug addicts and cyber criminals. We love to spread disinfo…create chaos, map all da networkz…”Since November 30, the group has compromised email and Twitter accounts of Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi, liquor baron Vijay Mallya, and senior NDTV journalists Ravish Kumar and Barkha Dutt. The group released personal data of Mallya and Dutt online.They earlier threatened to do the same on Gandhi, and former IPL chairman Lalit Modi. And now, they claim the deed is already done. “The targets we mentioned are already 0wn3d (owned). Lalit Modi is retarded enough to not see that yet, however. Maybe he should spend his time in a more productive manner. Assume, procuring new d3v1c3s (devices)?” the Legion member said.

 

Comments (0)

Light pollution hinders Milky Way view from one-third of humanity: Study

Tags: , , ,

Light pollution hinders Milky Way view from one-third of humanity: Study

Posted on 11 June 2016 by GGS News

Light pollution hinders Milky Way view from one-third of humanity: Study.

NEW DELHI, 11 JUNE : It has inspired astronomers, artists, musicians and poets but the Milky Way could become a distant memory for much of humanity, a new global atlas of light pollution suggests.

The study reveals that 60% of Europeans and almost 80% of North Americans cannot see the glowing band of our galaxy because of the effects of artificial lighting, while it is imperceptible to the entire populations of Singapore, Kuwait and Malta.

Overall, the Milky Way is no longer visible to more than one third of the world’s population.
Lead author Fabio Falchi from the Light Pollution Science and Technology Institute in Italy said the situation was a “cultural loss of unprecedented magnitude.”

Chris Elvidge of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and a co-author of the study, added that the times he has seen the Milky Way have been magical experiences.

“Through our technology we’ve cut off that possibility for large numbers of people for multiple generations now,” he said. “We’ve lost something – but how do we place value on it?”

Described by John Milton as “a broad and ample road whose dust is gold, and pavement stars,” the Milky Way is so obscured by the effects of modern lighting that it is no longer visible to 77% of the UK population, with the galaxy masked from view across nearly 14% of the country, including regions stretching from London to Liverpool and Leeds.

Further afield, areas around the cities of Hong Kong, Beijing and a large stretch of the East Coast of America are among those where a glimpse of the galactic band is out of the question – a situation also found across much of Qatar, the Netherlands and Israel. In Belgium, it cannot be seen in 51% of the country.

“Humanity has enveloped our planet in a luminous fog that prevents most of Earth’s population from having the opportunity to observe our galaxy,” the authors write.

The bright areas on the map show where the glow from artificial lighting blots out the stars and constellations.Published in the journal Science Advances by an international team of scientists, the research is based on data collected from space by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, together with computer models of sky luminescence and professional and citizen science measurements of sky brightness taken from the ground.

The resulting global atlas reveals that large swaths of humanity experience light pollution, including more than 99% of people living in the US and the European Union. People living near Paris would have to travel 900km to areas as such central Scotland, Corsica or central Spain to find a region with night skies almost unpolluted by light, the authors add.

By contrast, Central African Republic and Madagascar are among the countries least affected by light pollution, with nearly the entirety of Greenland boasting pristine skies.

“Until the advent of night-time lighting became really prominent in the 19th and 20th centuries, everybody would have been familiar with the Milky Way,” said Marek Kukula, public astronomer at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, who was not involved in the study. “We see it in mythology about the sky, in all cultures around the world. It is one of the obvious components of the sky along with the stars, the planets and the moon.”
When light from our streetlamps, homes and illuminations is thrown up into the sky it bounces off particles and moisture droplets in the atmosphere and is scattered, resulting in artificial “sky glow” – one of the key factors contributing to light pollution. The upshot is that spectacles like the Milky Way can become obscured from view.

“The night sky is part of our natural heritage. It is beautiful, it is awe-inspiring and being able to see it is a way for us to connect to the wider universe and understand our place in the natural world,” said Kukula. ”If we lose that it is a shame because we have lost that direct connection with something much bigger than us and something that is very beautiful.”

The situation could become worse. According to the new study, if all sodium lights are replaced with cool white LED lighting, artificial sky brightness seen across Europe could more than double as a result of the increase in blue-light emission.

And it isn’t only our view of the night sky that is affected by light pollution. “There are also biological consequences, not only on birds and insects and mammals, but also even on humans,” said Elvidge, pointing out that the light pollution can disrupt the natural behaviour of animals and has raised a number of human health concerns.

It isn’t all doom and gloom. Despite the Milky Way being masked from view in many cities across the UK there are still regions of the country where it is possible to get a good view of the night sky. “There are various dark sky parks and reserves in the UK which have been internationally certified by the International Dark Sky Association to have low levels of light pollution – places like Galloway Forest Park,” said Kukula, adding that various online tools can help to direct stargazers to the right part of the sky.

But the authors of the new study say more needs to be done to tackle the issue of light pollution. Among possible measures, says Elvidge, are the use of more shielded street lighting, motion-activated lights and cut-off times for illuminating buildings.

Kukula agrees, “It will reduce our electricity bills, it will reduce our carbon footprint, it won’t affect the lighting that we have on the streets,” he said. “And it will allow us to see more of the wonders of the night sky.”
“Generations to come will never see that beauty”We are here on planet Earth but we live in a huge cosmos, and its one of the things that links us to our position in the universe. And so it is wonderful to see it. I think by looking up at the stars we have endeavoured to do so many things, we’ve sent probes to Pluto and beyond, and if we lose contact with that I think we lose some of our ability to dream and to aspire. It starts with the Milky Way but where will it end?

I spent a wonderful six months working at a telescope in Chile, at the Gemini telescope, and there we could actually see [the Milky Way] – it did look like a path across the sky. It has inspired songs, it has inspired people to great endeavours and so I think the more light pollution there is the more we miss out on that, and the generations to come will never see that beauty.
Maggie Aderin-Pocock, space scientist and presenter of the Sky at Night

“I am perhaps more inspired by the Milky Way than any artist who has ever lived”
For me the Milky Way has been an unfailing source of inspiration and wonder, as basic component of my identity as the fact that I live on Earth in our Solar System.

I have been a passionate evangelist for the galaxy, and am perhaps more inspired by the Milky Way than any artist who has ever lived.

I deplore the barriers we have erected that block the view for most of Earth’s people. Nothing can clear the mind, elevate the soul, or inspire curiosity more than the Milky Way.

Jon Lomberg, artist and principal artistic collaborator of astronomer Carl Sagan
“It’s important that it’s not just astronomers who care about this”The night sky is the most universally-shared part of our environment. It’s been gazed and wondered at, throughout history, by people in all parts of the world. It’s indeed a sad deprivation that many young people have never seen a clear starry sky. And it’s important that it’s not just astronomers who care about this.

I’m not an ornithologist, but I’d feel deprived if songbirds disappeared from my garden. Likewise, there would surely be widespread sadness if light pollution screened out our celestial environment from ever more of us.

Lord Martin Rees, astronomer royal
“The Milky Way is our link to the Other”The Milky Way is our link to the Other: to the lost civilisations out there in the galaxy, so far away and so profligate that they appear not as stars, but as a single brush stroke of watery light. When we lose the Milky Way, we sever the umbilical cord that connects us to the wider universe.

Ben Miller, actor, comedian and author

“We, in our ceaseless dash to make money and cover the world with concrete, have lost this priceless treasureIt’s not just the Milky Way [people] can’t see. Who in the 21st Century has ever seen the Zodiacal Light – that beautiful cone of dusty light that can even outshine the Milky Way, a thrill to see if you are lucky enough to have dark skies where you live. And probably about 10,000 stars that the three Wise Men on their way to Bethlehem would have been able to see are all invisible to us in the cities, where we are swamped by mainly unnecessary stray light. From my roof in Kensington on a clear night I can see roughly 30 stars – it’s a tragedy, really. Along with all the other excesses of what we call civilisation, our first-hand awareness of the cosmos has been forgotten.

We are so fortunate to be living on a planet that gives us a view, not only of our own Solar System companions: the planets, comets, etc – but also of countless stars in our own Milky Way Galaxy. Because of this we’ve been able make the foundations of cosmology, discovering the very nature of the vast universe around us. From our position out on a spiral arm of the Galaxy, we see both inwards towards the centre of the Galaxy and outwards towards its edge. The billions of stars in the Galactic plane show up as a milky light which has enchanted people from the dawn of history. But we, in our ceaseless dash to make money and cover the world with concrete, have lost this priceless treasure. Along with almost all our wildlife, our contact with Nature, and our humanity.

Brian May, astrophysicist and lead guitarist of Queen
“We should act to protect our ability to enjoy the universe”The Milky Way evokes a feeling of awe when I see it. It always has and it always will. This is partly because it is rare to see now due to light pollution. It’s analogous to spotting a rare bird in your back garden. But I have many memories of seeing this band of hazy light from the dark skies of my village when I was younger. To be able to see the collective light from the stars making up our own galaxy gives a tantalising sense of the enormity of our universe and the structures within it. That so few people are now able to see now the Milky Way is a great loss. We are forcing ourselves to look inward and not outward. And just as we bemoan the loss of our countryside we should act to protect our ability to enjoy the universe. If we don’t, its inspirational value will be untapped and a site of scientific interest will be rendered accessible only using professional telescopes on mountains or on spacecraft.

Lucie Green, Professor of Physics at University College, London and presenter of the Sky at Night

Comments (0)

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics

Tags: , , , , ,

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics

Posted on 30 May 2016 by GGS News

Washington, 30 May : University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have created the world’s fastest stretchable, advanced wearable integrated circuits that shall push the Internet of Things (IoT) to a much more connected space. The platform that has been developed by these engineers may help manufacturers further the capabilities and applications of wearable electronics – including biomedical applications – using the new wireless broadband technology 5G.

With wavelength sizes varying from a millimetre to a metre, microwave radio frequencies are electromagnetic waves that use frequencies between 0.3 gigahertz to 300 gigahertz, a range that directly falls under 5G. In coming days, the wide microwave frequencies of 5G networks will connect a rapidly growing number of mobile phone users and shall also result in a significant increase in data speeds and coverage areas.In an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), epidermal electronic unis (electronics that stick to the skin like temporary tattoos) may allow health care staff to monitor their patients wirelessly and remotely, thus increasing patient convenience by totally removing the hassle of going through a variety of cables and wires every time for health check. While this application has been studied and brought to fore a lot many times earlier, what makes it specially unique and powerful here is that the new, stretchable integrated circuits have a special structure inspired by twisted-pair telephone cables.
These circuits accommodate two ultra-tiny intertwining power transmission lines in repeating S-curves. These serpentine shape formed in two layers by segmented metal blocks like a 3D puzzle provides the transmission lines with an ability to stretch without affecting their performance. It even helps shield the lines from external interference and simultaneously confines the electromagnetic waves flowing through them, almost entirely elimination current loss. As of now the researchers’ stretchable integrated circuits can work at a radio frequency up to 40 gigahertz.

Unlike other stretchable transmission lines, whose thickness may go up to 640 micrometers, the new stretchable integrated circuits are just 25 micrometres wide – a size tiny enough to be employed in epidermal electronic systems among several other applications. Zhenqiang “Jack” Ma, team leader of this project, stated that the team has found a way to integrate high-frequency active transistors into a useful circuit that can have wireless capabilities.

This study was published in Advanced Functional Materials journal.

Comments (0)

Ice age on Mars took place 400,000 years ago, claim scientists

Tags: , , , ,

Ice age on Mars took place 400,000 years ago, claim scientists

Posted on 27 May 2016 by GGS News

New Delhi, 27 May : Mars is in the process of emerging from an ice age that ended less than 400,000 years ago, scientists believe.

Satellite observations show evidence of the latest in a series of climate change swings caused by the planet tilting on its axis.

Researchers used a ground-penetrating radar instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft to investigate changes to the Martian north pole icecap.
Features below the surface revealed accumulation and flow patterns suggesting a retreat of ice to the north pole that began about 370,000 years ago.

Ice ages on Mars are driven by the same influences that cause them on Earth – long-term changes in the planet’s orbit and tilt which affect the amount of sunlight falling on different parts of its surface.
Mars may experience more pronounced climate change cycles because its tilt alters by as much as 60 degrees on time scales of hundreds of thousands to millions of years.

In contrast the Earth’s tilt varies by only about two degrees over the same amounts of time.
Dr Isaac Smith, from Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, US, who led the study published in the journal Science, said: “Because the climate on Mars fluctuates with larger swings in axial tilt, and ice will distribute differently for each swing, Mars would look substantially different in the past than it does now.

“Furthermore, because Mars has no oceans at present, it represents a simplified ‘laboratory’ for understanding climate science on Earth.”

Learning about ice on Mars was also important to the future of human exploration of the Red Planet, he said.

“Water will be a critical resource for a Martian outpost,” Dr Smith added.

Comments (0)

Advertise Here


Advertise Here















View amritpal Singh SIDHU's profile on LinkedIn